Tag Archives: Facebook Marketing

Reaching Franchise Candidates on Facebook

18 Oct

Facebook Reach

 

Are you using Facebook to sell Franchises?

For nearly all Franchise Development executives with whom I’ve spoken this year, the answer is “Sure!”  Less than 2 two years ago, the answer was, “Why?”

I have recently spoken to several groups about Social Media and Franchising including the International Franchise Association Convention 2016 FLDC in Atlanta, and IFA’s Women’s Franchise Network in Chicago.  At these events, the subject that attendees keep coming back to is Facebook Custom Audience Targeting for franchise development.

Custom Audience Targeting allows you to upload a database of email addresses and then serve up Facebook ads to only those people. While Facebook won’t open the floodgate of targeting your prospects by name, it will match the person’s email address from your list to a Facebook user profile.

Here are step-by-step instructions on uploading your email list to Facebook Custom Audience Targeting.

 

An Easy Touchpoint for Your Prospects

While consumer marketers have been taking advantage of this capability for nearly as long as there have been ads on Facebook, many franchise marketers have not yet discovered it. Most franchisors are focused on creating awareness with larger audiences based on demographics. They’re missing an easy touchpoint with their leads and candidates who could be engaged in a place where they are easy to reach.

And REACHING them is what it’s really all about! This isn’t about finding people who you never knew existed. It’s about not discovering a whole new species of humanoid who wants to be a franchisee. This is about getting in front of your candidates where they already live.

The average American adult spends nearly 7 hours per week on Facebook. Insert yourself and your brand into those hours among the political memes, game highlights, family photos, and cat videos.

 

Multiple Stages, Multiple Messages

If your email database is updated and well-managed, you can serve messages appropriate for every stage in your sales funnel. One message may be great for an old lead that faded away a while back. A very different message may fit a candidate further along in the pipeline. The more narrowed-down your target audience, the more relevant your message, and the more efficient your ad spend!

 

A Unique Marketing Opportunity for Franchising

Franchise Development is different than other Business-To-Business sales types in that prospects and leads use their home or personal email addresses on whatever submission forms brought those email addresses into your database. This is perfect for Facebook Customer Audience Targeting, as most people sign up with Facebook using their personal email address.  Selling other business services can be challenging using this method, as most B2B sales pros have prospects’ work email addresses, not the ones that match Facebook’s database. In this way, as in many other ways, Fran Dev is much more like B2C selling in the digital world.

Post Every Day on All of Your Facebook Pages

6 Sep

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In the presentation titled 9 Social Media Best Practices for Franchisors, the practice that is most challenging for some marketers is also my favorite:
 
Post Every Day on All of Your Facebook Pages.

Few argue with the value of good, regular content flowing to their fans’ newsfeeds. And, in case consumers seek and discover your page on their own, my observation is that having a page with nothing new on it in the past two weeks looks like you’re out of business.

But some marketers are challenged by this daunting daily task looming over their content calendars. The reluctance may be caused by a feeling that daily posts are too much for their fans and that it’s just too hard to produce.

 

Too much? No.

With today’s painfully low organic reach, your risk of overserving content to a fan is nonexistent. When only 1% to 10% of your organic posts is actually seen by your fans, your daily posts will rarely hit their news feeds once each week.

Tell any fans who think you post too often the same thing I would tell radio listeners 20 years ago, when they would call my station and complain, “You played that same Pearl Jam song yesterday at 8am and then again at 10pm!” I would respond, “You’re right. THANKS for listening so much! Let me send you a t-shirt!” They may have been an irritated listener (or more likely, one who just wanted to show they caught a perceived flaw). But, to me we had someone who was engaged and listening for 14 straight hours! Now if only they had an Arbitron ratings diary…

 

Too hard? No.

Posting this much can be hard. It’s especially hard if it’s in addition to your current marketing workload or job description (whatever that is). But being too hard is no longer a reason to not do something. I frequently tell friends and groups with whom I speak that it’s now okay to ignore anyone who gives the excuse of not improving because it’s too hard. They will be soon gone from their current position and will no longer block you.

 

Exceptions? Yes.

Are there days when you shouldn’t post at least once? Yes, but it has less to do with the quantity of posts, and more about special occasions when your content is best throttled back. See these suggestions on days to skip posting.

DIFF: Do It For Franchisees

5 Apr

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What’s The DIFF?

One of the best things a Franchisor can offer Franchisees has been good content for marketing and social media engagement. And now this includes leading the franchisees’ content publishing efforts.

Creating content for your entire organization is great. But if that content never gets in front of consumers, it’s worth nothing.

 

DIY Doesn’t Work in Social Media for Franchisees

I spent several years creating social media marketing models where franchisees would “get with the program” and engage daily in social. Do It Yourself social media is a great idea in theory for franchisees, but not all practical. Getting 10% of franchisees in any system to engage was considered success.

We’re now in a Do It For Franchisees world of social marketing.

Local business owners know that marketing is one of the disciplines that they need to tackle. But that’s the problem: it’s just one of things they need to tackle! And when the hours in a day get tight, marketing gets dropped every time.

 

Don’t Be Overhead. Be Air Cover.

Operators, owners, and Franchisees need to focus on running their business, managing their employees, serving customers, and making product, but not becoming a digital marketing expert.

That’s where you come as the expert to figure out the best social approach for your brand and the microcosm of the brand that is the local franchisee’s Facebook page.

You not only can create the appropriate content for that page, but also you can decide the suitable number of daily postings, choose the right timing, and replicate for all franchisees in your system.

That’s where you come in as marketing air cover.

    

It’s good for them. It’s even better for your brand!

As mentioned earlier, if you can get 10% of franchisees from any system to log in and use a social media platform, you’re doing great. But that’s a horrible number! You can’t accomplish much with only 10% of your system.

Doing It For Franchisees (or at least the inactive 90%) means no more worry about policing the messages for consistency. You manage the message and empower the franchisees to run their business.

 

 

 

Facebook Live Mic Drop

3 Feb

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I’m not sure if Facebook just dropped a mic or a bomb on Periscope and Meerkat. Facebook Live is replacing every cool feature of those live streaming mobile video apps with the friendly space where most people you can hope to know already live.

If you still think that Facebook isn’t eating the internet, think again. Here’s the recent scorecard:

Facebook Features                             Platforms That Were Important 5 Minutes Ago

Facebook Live                                        Periscope, Meerkat

Native Video on Facebook             YouTube

Facebook Reviews                              Yelp and all other review sites

Facebook Pages                                   Your corporate website

Facebook Instant Articles               Every newspaper and magazine on Earth

Facebook Ads                                        Everything else

 

 

Plan Your Facebook Tactics Now Around the 2016 Elections

12 Jan

 

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The first votes in the 2016 Presidential race are less than 3 weeks away. The Iowa Caucuses and the New Hampshire & South Carolina Primaries in February mean an explosion of political messages in an already-crowded media space. It’s estimated that approximately $500 Million may be spent on Facebook ads for the 2016 Presidential Election.

Franchisors, franchisees, and all business owners need to figure out their Facebook plans now.

Even before this massive spend leading up to each state’s primary, the organic updates from candidates, increased posts from political bloggers, and campaign stories from news outlets are already consuming most of the attention on Facebook.

Ted Cruz is broadcasting using the new Facebook Live streaming video every day. Ben Carson’s campaign took off entirely from Facebook fans spreading his messages. Donald Trump posts pictures and remarks from the campaign trail several times per day. The campaigns of both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders manage multiple pages for their organizations in each state showing a strong local community focus and ground game.

Imagine how much more crowded the space will be in 30, 60, or 90 days. And that will pale in comparison to later this year when the two eventual nominees, their parties, and their PACs throw hundreds of millions into Facebook ads for the general election. Imagine the competition for consumers’ attention!

Organic reach using your current tactics will be zero. How can your message get to your potential customers and candidates? Here are a few ideas to try to rise above the noise.

1. Post when others are not posting. Get a calendar of upcoming primary events and avoid the days before, during, and after a primary in any state or a debate. Instead pick other days of that same week to post. This may mean moving out of your comfort zone of days / times for posting. But that’s a good thing; I’ve never been a fan of so-called “best times” to post. Your customers are active on social 24 hours per day, 7 days a week.

2. Plan on buying more ads and increase your ad budget. There’s no way around this!

3. Be prepared with a non-Facebook Plan B. If Trump and Clinton (or whoever the 2 nominees are!), as well as the DNC, the RNC, and the PACs all start dumping a half Billion dollars into Facebook, you may have to explore alternative channels. If your business is not already set up on Instagram, Periscope, Snapchat and other places, do so now and run some tests. Get ready to move into that space if you find engagement.

 

 

 

 

Don’t Redo Your Website in 2016

8 Dec

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“No one’s looking at our website. Quick – redesign it!”  

But if no one’s looking, then why waste resources? With marketers changing jobs so frequently, it’s easy to fall into the trap of changing websites along with the marketing professional.  The new head of marketing joins the company, and his first move is to redo the website. Why?

  • It’s what he knows how to do.
  • It has the old head of marketing’s mark on it.
  • He’s got a long list of loyal vendors or old teammates who can do the job.
  • Refreshing a website is safe, while trying something new is risky.

None of these are good reasons to change your current website!

And, the CEO knows just enough about marketing to be dangerous and say, “Sure, it makes sense to do a new website. The internet is important, right?”  

The problem is that no additional customers will see the new site versus the old site unless you are actively attracting viewers.

 

What should you do instead?

 

1. Turn your corporate website into a blog.

Maintain an active blog page as your “main” landing page of your company’s website. Keep it fresh with new stories about your customers, industry, and brand.

Search engines like articles better than corporate pages. And, so do your customers!

Links to your blog posts give you “stuff” to put on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Seriously, aside from fresh blog posts or articles, what else from your corporate site could you share on your Facebook that anyone would want to see? A link to your “about us” page or your pricing page? Hardly!

 

2. Focus on Facebook

A no-brainer? Yes, to some. But we still see resources going into audience-free corporate websites, rather than the online places where your customers are already living.

Your Facebook page isn’t even the most important thing to focus on.  The posts that you publish – and pay to boost – are what will appear on your customers’ feeds are the key.

 

Curated Content Is Like a Holiday Rerun

18 Nov

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Just a few months ago, I was much more of an advocate for aggregating and curating content on social media channels. I saw the need for sharing content created by others as an important part of your digital marketing strategy.

However, it now may be time for many brands to tell their story more, and share others’ stories less.

Curated content is a rerun

When I speak with marketers about social channels and how content works with audiences, I frequently draw comparisons and analogies to television programming. Curated content is a rerun. As the holidays approach, TV networks will start relying more on reruns. What are they saying? That they’ve given up on having much of an audience at this time.

By running too much non-original content on your social channels, you’re saying the same thing.

Reruns aren’t all bad

Look at the huge ratings for constant reruns of The Big Bang Theory on TBS, and Seinfeld running in syndication for nearly 20 years. And every year networks trot out Rudolph, Frosty, Heat Miser, and the rest of the 40-year-old animated shows.

But it’s a rerun. It’s not original. When you share a lot of aggregated stories, your audience has probably seen it or something similar already. Worst of all, you may get a bit of credit for sharing the nugget, but your brand is not the star. You’re telling someone else’s story.

As mentioned earlier, I used to be much more of a proponent of posting content created by others, especially popular content. My aim was to promote the idea of just getting something on those empty pages – and with any luck, something popular. But now no one is paying attention to your Facebook page anyway; they’re focused on their Facebook feed. And hopefully you get a little portion of that feed where you’ll have the opportunity to get their attention.

Be the TV Programmer

So think of your page as your own TV network, and use curated content only to fill those holes when you don’t have a new blog post or original video or podcast to share. And when you do share others’ stuff, it may make sense to get share the work of business partners, channel partners, friends in the industry, and other marketers you know. Perhaps they will reciprocate on days when their programming is running dry too!

 

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