Tips for Using LinkedIn Video

13 Aug

LinkedIn Video

 

Many LinkedIn users can now post native video directly from the LinkedIn mobile app. Grab your phone and check it now. If the posting area now shows a video icon, then access has rolled out to you.

Like a Facebook Live video, it’s easy to fire up your camera and share a video instantly or share a video already saved in your camera roll. But unlike Facebook, these videos will have business-focused content…I HOPE…

You can post this video from your personal profile as a representative of your brand (or your personal brand) instead of your company page. This is a great feature; your personal profile is much more powerful than your company page. You probably have more connections than your company page has followers. Besides, who really follows company pages and engages with them? I’ll tell you who: people who want to sell the company something or get a job there!

LinkedIn will share with you the company names and titles of those who viewed your video. While this will be good to know, perhaps someday the viewer data will become targeting data. But for now, this video you’re about to upload will be seen be your connections and anyone else with whom they share it.

As you’re trying it out, here are a few tips to consider:

  • Sales folks: don’t use the video to only push your latest sales promotion. Tell a story! Tell stories about your customers, some best practices, industry issues, and anything that would make someone want to have a conversation with you.
  • Marketing pros: Again, tell a story, and leave out all corporate-speak about comprehensive global solutions and enterprise services yadda yadda yadda…
  • It can be ten minutes long, but don’t make it ten minutes long. Start with 30 seconds. When your 30 second videos are so good that your connections want more, increase to one minute.

#TBT #Vinyl KISS, Dressed to Kill, 1975

10 Aug

KISS Dressed to Kill

KISS
Dressed to Kill
Casablanca Records
1975

Lookin’ good gentlemen…

KISS Dressed to Kill

KISS Dressed to Kill

#TBT #Vinyl Pink Floyd, Division Bell, 1993

27 Jul

Division Bell

Pink Floyd
The Division Bell
Columbia Records
1993

The best Pink Floyd is Pink Floyd without Roger Waters. This is one of my favorite albums from Floyd,  and it has also a fantastic album cover by artist Storm Thorgerson.

 

 

#TBT #Vinyl #Cassette #CD Guns N’ Roses, Appetite for Destruction, 1987.

20 Jul

Appetite For Destruction

Guns N’ Roses
Appetite for Destruction
Geffen Records
1987

 

The greatest album in history turns 30 years old tomorrow.

Here are copies of the the original LP, the cassette, and compact disc. It still sounds as good as it did 30 years ago and better than anything that anyone has made since then!

 

Appetite For Destruction

Appetite For Destruction

Appetite For Destruction

Appetite For Destruction

 

#TBT #Vinyl — Styx, Paradise Theatre, 1981

13 Jul

Styx Paradise Theatre

 

Styx
Paradise Theatre
A&M Records
1981

 

I was never the biggest Styx fan, but as a kid, I loved this album. It had some screaming guitars by James Young (“Snowblind” and “Half-Penny”), new-wave-ish pop by Tommy Shaw (“Too Much Time”) and some funky theatrical jazz by Dennis DeYoung (“Nothing Ever Goes As Planned”).

The packaging was cool. The LPs had laser etching and the cover and back paintings were fantastic – truly a lost art!

 

Styx Paradise Theatre

Styx Paradise Theatre

Styx Paradise Theatre

Styx Paradise Theatre

Christmas In July: Planning Q4 Digital Marketing Now

12 Jul

Christmas in July

 

It’s impossible to overstate the importance of 4th Quarter sales for retailers, restaurants, and many other small businesses or multi-location businesses. While operations and other parts of your organization have had the rest of the year mapped out since last year, your digital marketing activities may not even be finalized for back-to-school promotions, let alone holiday shopping.

In the past, too many marketers have waited until the summer was over to gear up for the holidays. But now that’s too late. It’s now Christmas in July or at least planning your digital marketing tactics for Christmas during July.

Also, is 2018 the year your big idea explodes? If next year is your “hockey stick year,” then Q4 better be solid. To get started, here are three questions to ask yourself during July:

 

1. What are you going to do now to have a great Q4?

What will compel customers to pay you a visit and make a purchase? Do you have a killer promotion ready to roll?

 

2. How are you getting people into your stores or onto your website?

Facebook (organic) posts? Forget it. Tweets? Unless your name is Donald, forget it.

You’ve got to hit large numbers of people or smaller numbers of the right people using:

  • Facebook ads
  • Pay Per Click ads
  • Display ads

Blog posts and other forms of content marketing are great for awareness and long term branding, but you need to guarantee traffic soon.  Find what advertising and promotions work now and pour some fuel on it. And when I say fuel, I mean ad dollars.

 

3. Are the customers you had last year coming back, or are they buying from Amazon?

This one is very important for retailers – all boutique shops, specialty stores, chains, or franchises. We think we have a loyal base, so why would they not come back in this year

I’ll tell you why … there are an estimated 80 million Amazon Prime customers. Many of your customers are part of that. Use digital ads to reach them and give them a reason to get off their big fat lazy Amazon and come into your store!

 

#TBT #Vinyl Men At Work, Business As Usual, 1982

29 Jun

Men at Work, Business As Usual

Men At Work
Business As Usual
Columbia Records
1982

In June of 1982, I came home from camp and our town had it:  MTV. The first video I saw was “Who Can It Be Now” by Men At Work.  I was hooked ever since…

 

 

Men at Work, Business as Usual

Men at Work, Business as Usual

Keys to the Mobile Kingdom

28 May

 

Mobile Kingdom

 

I’m looking forward to moderating a great panel at the upcoming Franchise Consumer Marketing Conference in Atlanta. In the session, Mobile – New Ideas to Drive In-store Visits, I’ll speak with a panel of marketing executives from the franchise sector to discover how they are using new innovations in mobile to drive traffic into their retail and restaurant establishments.

Do you have questions about mobile marketing best practices that you would like to ask these execs?  Are you struggling with getting new customers in the doors? Are your older strategies and tactics not working? Are you looking for ways to get your franchisees involved?

Please share any questions you would like to include in the session either in the comments section below or privately via LinkedIn Messaging or email at Jack@Qiigo.com. I’ll share your questions at the June 20 session and mention you (unless you would prefer to remain anonymous).

We will announce the final line-up of panelists next week! And if you’re thinking of attending FCMC this year, check out the fantastic agenda and details.

 

Franchise Consumer Marketing Conference

 

 

 

#TBT #Vinyl Twisted Sister, Come Out and Play, 1985

25 May

Twisted Sister Come Out and Play

Twisted Sister
Come Out and Play
Atlantic Records
1985

 

The beginning of the end of the Glam Metal era may have been this flop by Twisted Sister. It had cool LP packaging, but I think by ’85 America was done with Dee Snider and crew…

Twisted Sister Come Out and Play

Twisted Sister Come Out and Play

Twisted Sister Come Out and Play

Twisted Sister Come Out and Play

Storytelling and Franchising: Keeping It Simple.

15 May

Multi-Unit Franchising

 

Franchise Update Media hosted another spectacular Multi-Unit Franchising Conference recently in Las Vegas. This is one of my favorite annual business conferences due the diverse backgrounds, skill sets, and interests of the attendees.

The final day included a fantastic session discussing issues impacting small business owners. The International Franchise Association’s Matt Haller moderated the panel which included Catherine Monson of FASTSIGNS, Matthew Patinkin of Double P Corp, Ron Feldman of ApplePie Capital, and IFA Chair Shelly Sun of BrightStar Care. This “A-Team” of business leaders offered their candid insights on many subjects, but the prevailing topic was the National Labor Relations Board and its 2015 ruling on the joint employer standard.

It occurs to me that such non-elected policy makers, as well as some elected officials, journalists, and activists are dreadfully uneducated about the ownership of a franchised business. This leads to the general public being uninformed and in many cases purposefully misinformed.

If we want to correct this, we need tell the story of franchising in simple terms —  so simple, in fact, that a politician and maybe even a journalist could understand.

Here are my two suggestions to properly and simply communicate the role of a franchisee:

1. The Franchisee Is a Customer of the Franchisor

There’s no clearer argument than showing that a franchisee is a customer of the franchisors and not an employee or middle-manager. There are many things small business owners must purchase in order to open their doors. The purchase from the franchisor is just one of those things.

As an example, let’s use a home services franchise brand such as a plumbing, landscaping, or cleaning franchise. There are several things you need to buy If you want to own one of these businesses including:

A) The Franchise.
B) A Truck.

If you buy a Ford F150 for your business, does this mean The Ford Motor Company is a joint employer of your staff?

Of course not. The car brand from whom you purchased your truck is not in charge of your employees.  Also, the plumbing brand from whom you purchased your franchise is not in charge of your employees.

 

2. Not Franchisees. Owners.

While some franchise systems may have specific language that they can or can’t use in some agreements, in general discussions we should refer to owners as owners.

If we, as an industry, had used this terminology more often in recent years, the anti-business Washington bureaucrats, lobbyists, and activists may have targeted a different industry. They would have perpetrated their schemes on a business sector without owners.

 

 

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