Tag Archives: social media engagement

Who Is the Worst at Social Media? The Media.

10 Sep

We frequently read about who or what brands are efficiently using social media to engage with customers. 

But we rarely see a blog or a conference track looking at who is really bad at social media.  Until now. Let’s begin!

Let’s first look at an industry: The Media. To say the traditional media – television, radio, newspaper, and magazine producers – have been slow to adapt to social media is like saying you were resistant to working with the street punks who mugged you. The brightest of media leaders knew that this new means of communication would eat their lunch. And even they were not smart enough to work with social media instead of against it.

Great image from themetapicture.com!

 

Traditional news outlets remind me of record companies 10 to 15 years ago. At first they mocked the coming of the internet. Then when they saw that it could cut into their business, they fought it. When that didn’t work, they pretended to welcome the internet. Finally they positioned themselves as pioneers.

And the bigger they are, the worse they are at engaging in the digital space. The New York Times “discovered” Twitter sometime around 2010. By 2011, they were pretending to lead the field.

Some print news outlets have become more valuable to consumers in providing sharable content (i.e. pictures, stories and credibility that we can’t conjure up on our own).  In fact, consumers who share news socially tend to flock to traditional sources as shown in this BurrellesLuce infographic. But, newspapers rarely do anything else to engage with those readers other than provide a nice space on their blog site for comments.

Many broadcasters use social but not to engage with viewers or do anything remotely interesting that would compel us to use their product/brand/service more. Some broadcasters – especially CNN – pretend that they’re social by airing Tweets during the news broadcast. This is poor, lazy journalism. Sure, why send a reporter out to actually, you know, report. Let’s just click one button and show viewers what Ashton Kutcher or a Kardashian has to say about the subject. It’s irrelevant but easy.

And I don’t want to hear the lame excuse that newsrooms are understaffed and budgets have been slashed. Welcome to every company in America in 2012, news guys! Where have you been? Every company and every worker in the US is doing more with less. Our economy is in shambles, not that the media has noticed. In adverse times, winners suck it up, wear many hats, and look to new innovations. But that would require thought and creativity, things that left mainstream media studios long ago.

I pick on CNN because they really are the worst of the worst. Their idea of Social Media is to broadcast – on TV – what others are Tweeting. Thanks CNN, but I will skip your show and just read it myself on my computer or phone. Good thing you’re paying big money to @andersoncooper to read Twitter from those nice studios in Atlanta. No wonder your ratings are at an all-time low and you’re getting creamed by everyone from Fox News to Nick at Nite.

NBC is another clueless social media wonder. I only know this from catching their social media “engagement” during the Olympics. It featured Tamron Hall, who host Mary Carillo introduced regularly as “our social media guru”. Uggggg. And, you guessed it, their idea of a guru is someone who reports on what others are Tweeting. Really? You sent a reporter and a crew to London to do that? Where are the actually conversations with viewers on social channels? Where are the stories, videos, contests, and other things that NBC could have shared?      

I see glimpses of hope at the local level. Several local affiliates promote Facebook or Twitter as simply another way for their viewers to get the news. This is still broadcasting, but at least they see social channels not as some new magic like the clueless NBC network people, but as another venue for communications – “Catch us on Channel X, Digital channel X.1, channel1x.com, or @channelXnews on Twitter”… It’s a start, and it’s better than the networks are doing.

Andy Griffith and The 3 Stages of Social Media Engagement

3 Jul

Note: here is a republished post from November of 2011 I wanted to share as we remember Andy Griffith today.

As we begin to wrap up a year of explosive growth in Social Media usage and engagement, I’m seeing many Social Media Marketers moving into new stages of their own involvement. It reminds me of similar changes of audience engagement by one of the all-time great story tellers.
  
I speak, of course, of Andy Griffith’s portrayal of Sheriff Andy Taylor of Mayberry!

Stage 1: Over the top and finding our way

At the start of The Andy Griffith Show, Andy’s depiction was the same as the characters he had been playing on stage and screen and in his popular monologues and comedy records for the previous few years. Andy was over-the-top, absurd, and loud. It’s what Andy knew how to do to get attention and laughs. 
 
Andy Griffith

Stage 1 Andy: All Laughs

We dig into our own history of past success and use those same tactics when launching our social media engagement. Sometimes it fits, but more often than not, marketers need to tweak their voice and role, leading to…


Stage 2: Getting down to business and finding our role

After the first season or so, Andy realized that it would be best for the show if he played the straight man and let those around him get the laughs. His decision to pay it forward catapulted the show into legendary status.

Andy Griffith

Stage 2 Andy: Paying It Forward

The character of Andy as the normal and wise hub for the crazy Mayberry citizens’ shenanigans is a great role model for how Social Media Marketers should carry themselves within their online communities. Be the Andy by helping solve your connections’ business problems, mediating different point of views, and most of all promoting others before yourself.

Note, many so-called Social Media “Experts” or “Gurus” are the equivalent of Deputy Barney Fife. They take credit for others’ heroics, crow about their own expertise, and obsess on the tools of the trade rather than the message. Barneys don’t really make a community worse; in fact, they can be funny. But in the end, we’re just laughing at them. 

 
Stage 3: Getting annoyed by and tired of those around us

It would be best if you as a Social Media Marketer could stay in a perpetual stage two. Toward the end of The Andy Griffith Show’s original run, Andy’s character further developed into a role that you don’t want to be. These episodes are easy to identify as they are in color and “Angry Andy” is constantly irritated by the dimwits around him.   

Andy and Aunt Bee

Stage 3 Andy: Annoyed

If you feel yourself getting easily agitated by the day to day engagement with the Goobers and Aunt Bees in your online communities, it may be time to stop and to move on to new challenges.
 

Social Media: Get In, Get Out, Get On With Your Day

20 May

Today’s guest post is from my friend Jack Campisi of Engage121. When working with his clients who range from large franchise systems to small business owners, Jack’s advice is to “Get In, Get Out, Get on with your Day!” – a concept I love! JC reports in here from a conference where he’s leading a discussion on SM basics.

Jack Campisi

Jack Campisi: Get In, Get Out, Get On With Your Day.

….

Platos Closet Social Media Group

….
I
ran two great workshops on the basics of social media today at the Plato’s Closet Convention in Las Vegas, and I tweeted pics of the groups during the sessions. Here’s a shot of one of the groups.


….

One of the great things about these events is that even though I am teaching a class, I also end up learning a lot. One of the biggest challenges facing small businesses, and franchises like this, is that the level of social media knowledge varies greatly from person to person. And all of these people, no mater their social media savvy, are all busy. So the objective today was to help them understand the social media landscape, rules of the road and the tools at their disposal. No small task.

One of the things I encouraged the group to do, especially the newbies, was to not jump head first into the deep-end of the social media pool. Start slow… get your toes wet. Start to surf the various sites like Facebook, Twitter and blogs. See what’s being said and done. Get an idea of how it works. Get the lay of the land. Once you’ve done that, you’ll have a better idea of where you want to start in social media. 

Social Media for Senior Executives

25 Mar

PRSA Chicago Presents: Social Media for Senior Executives with Very Special Guest, Gini Dietrich – April 19

 

Engagement with consumers via Social Media channels is no longer an option for Public Relations and Communications executives. Whether you’re still getting started with your own personal digital presence or you’re already a top influencer, join PRSA Chicago for a special program for senior-level execs and future senior-level execs! You will learn practical tips and tactics to take your social media game to the next level.

Gini Dietrich

 

Our guest speaker is Gini Dietrich, founder and chief executive officer of Arment Dietrich, Inc., a firm that uses non-traditional marketing in a digital world.

 

 

Gini authors the popular Spin Sucks blog and can be found writing at Crain’s Chicago Business, AllBusiness, and Franchise Times. She delivers numerous keynotes, panel discussions, CEO coaching sessions, and workshops across North America on the subject of using online technology in communication, marketing, sales, and HR. One of the top rated communications professionals on the social networks, Gini was recently named the number one PR person on the channels, according to Klout and TechCrunch, and number one on Twitter, according to TweetLevel.

Sponsored by MSL Chicago and Big Shoes Network

 Register for PRSA Chicago

When
Tuesday, April 19, 2011 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

Where

Maggiano’s Little Italy
516 North Clark Street
Chicago, IL 

Social Media: Candy for Franchises

26 Jan

  Social Media Hearts

 
Social Media is a means to give your brand a voice, put a face on your corporation, and give consumers “someone” to engage. Remember, people don’t buy from companies; they buy from people.

  

Nowhere is the opportunity greater than in the Franchise Industry, where even the biggest global brand is represented by a local business owner (and many times literally mom n’ pop)! The explosive growth of social media platforms means most of your potential customers are now reachable. Smart franchise systems are reaching those customers by empowering their franchisees with training and tools to be that local voice, face, and identifiable part of the community.

  

And, last but certainly not least, a social media plan and tools will give your franchise sales team a boost by presenting franchise candidates with an attractive – and affordable – benefit to selecting your system above others. The very fact that you have a plan of attack in social media may a deal-maker for some potential franchisees.

 

If you’re in franchising, I hope to see you at the 51st Annual International Franchise Association Convention . Perhaps we can continue this discussion!

 

I have organized a Tweetup at the IFA show with Deb Evans, Matt Haller, and my colleagues from Engage121. If you’re attending, please join us on Sunday evening. Here are the details: http://tweetvite.com/event/ifa

 

 

 

To Friend or not to Friend? What Small Business Owners Should Consider

17 Nov

Welcome Guest Blogger Jillian Gile from Pounding the Pavement with some Facebook advice for small business owners.
 
 Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you know that Facebook is the hottest social media tool for small businesses.  Facebook can be the tool you need to make that personal connection with customers that is so critical.  There are many reasons to use Facebook in your marketing campaigns, but there are also a few pitfalls you should be aware of. 

Pros:

It’s the ultimate word-of-mouth

Facebook is where people go to post what they’re having for dinner, what they think about their favorite TV show, and yes – even where they shop.  Having a Facebook presence means you can be personally involved with getting your name out there.  If one customer “friends” you, all their friends will see your name, even if they don’t actively post about your store. 

Big returns on a small investment

Maintaining and updating a Facebook page does not take up large chunks of time, and Facebook is free, so any return is a huge profit.  You can even sign up to advertise your business on Facebook, and ad packages are affordable for even the tiniest budget – think $5/day or less. 

Facebook – it’s everywhere you want to be

Smart phones are almost ubiquitous – and with these mobile internet connections, Facebook is mobile, too.  Customers running errands may see your well-timed status update and be influenced to stop by your store while they’re out and about. This has happened to me on more than one occasion, when my favorite consignment store posts a photo of a dress or jacket I just have to have, right now.

Become a part of the community

So much time and energy is spent making a business an integral part of a community (think yearbook ads).  Facebook has been accused of replacing face-to-face social interaction, but you can use this substitution to your advantage.  As part of Facebook, your business can gain a prominence that makes people support your business. 

Obviously, Facebook isn’t all sunshine and roses.  We didn’t need the movie The Social Network to show us that Facebook has some disadvantages, too. 

Cons:

There is such a thing as too much exposure

Multiple daily postings about your latest deal, favorite brand, and current giveaway can annoy your Facebook friends and even make them unfriend you.  Try to stick to one post a day (or every other day) and make these announcements count – coupons, funny anecdotes, community announcements. 

Facebook isn’t business friendly

Facebook encourages businesses to create pages and advertise on their site, but they are very strict about protecting their users from fake accounts created solely for a business, and will crack down on anyone who has created multiple accounts for this reason.  Stick to the Facebook page option, and play by the rules. 

You don’t get to 500 million friends without making a few enemies

OK, we’re not suggesting you create an advertising war to get to 500 million friends, but creating a vibrant community of fans on your page will definitely take some time and effort.  Do not stalk your customers or force them to provide you with e-mail addresses so you can boost appearances.  Be patient. 

Facebook isn’t for everyone

I worked at a small town real estate office that tried to use its Facebook fan page to draw in customers with photos of homes and announcing mortgage rates.  The problem is, their fans were all clients who had already purchased homes and weren’t in the market anymore.  They had to revamp their Facebook goals, and become more of a source for community news, which made them a resource for clients and clients’ friends.  When you start your own Facebook page, give some serious thoughts to what your customers need, and what will draw them to your page. 

The point is – is Facebook worth the effort for a small business owner?  My answer is a cautious yes.  Think about what your customers need:  Do they need coupons?  A friendly reminder you’re still around?  A place to find out what’s going on in their town?  Establish what your business needs are, and don’t hesitate to poll likeminded business owners to see what’s worked for them.

Jillian Gile is a guest blogger for Pounding the Pavement and a writer on online career training  for the Guide to Career Education.

Andy Griffith and The 3 Stages of Social Media Engagement

12 Nov

As we begin to wrap up a year of explosive growth in Social Media usage and engagement, I’m seeing many Social Media Marketers moving into new stages of their own involvement. It reminds me of similar changes of audience engagement by one of the all-time great story tellers.
 
I speak, of course, of Andy Griffith’s portrayal of Sheriff Andy Taylor of Mayberry!

 

Stage 1: Over the top and finding our way

At the start of The Andy Griffith Show, Andy’s depiction was the same as the characters he had been playing on stage and screen and in his popular monologues and comedy records for the previous few years. Andy was over-the-top, absurd, and loud. It’s what Andy knew how to do to get attention and laughs. 
Andy Griffith

Stage 1 Andy: All Laughs

 

We dig into our own history of past success and use those same tactics when launching our social media engagement. Sometimes it fits, but more often than not, marketers need to tweak their voice and role, leading to…

  

Stage 2: Getting down to business and finding our role

After the first season or so, Andy realized that it would be best for the show if he played the straight man and let those around him get the laughs. His decision to pay it forward catapulted the show into legendary status.

Andy Griffith

Stage 2 Andy: Paying It Forward

 
The character of Andy as the normal and wise hub for the crazy Mayberry citizens’ shenanigans is a great role model for how Social Media Marketers should carry themselves within their online communities. Be the Andy by helping solve your connections’ business problems, mediating different point of views, and most of all promoting others before yourself.

Note, many so-called Social Media “Experts” or “Gurus” are the equivalent of Deputy Barney Fife. They take credit for others’ heroics, crow about their own expertise, and obsess on the tools of the trade rather than the message. Barneys don’t really make a community worse; in fact, they can be funny. But in the end, we’re just laughing at them. 

 
Stage 3: Getting annoyed by and tired of those around us

It would be best if you as a Social Media Marketer could stay in a perpetual stage two. Toward the end of The Andy Griffith Show’s original run, Andy’s character further developed into a role that you don’t want to be. These episodes are easy to identify as they are in color and “Angry Andy” is constantly irritated by the dimwits around him.
   

Andy and Aunt Bee

Stage 3 Andy: Annoyed

If you feel yourself getting easily agitated by the day to day engagement with the Goobers and Aunt Bees in your online communities, it may be time to stop and to move on to new challenges.
 
 

Social Media Marketing: Chicago, 1893.

20 Sep

 

White City

The 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago


Frederick Olmstead
was a brilliant landscape architect responsible for such masterpieces as Central Park in NYC and the grounds at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition (aka The Chicago World’s Fair). Here are his thoughts on drawing more attendees to the Word’s Fair in June of 1893:

 

Frederick Olmstead

Frederick Olmstead

 

“This is the advertising now most important to be developed; that of high-strung, contagious enthusiasm, growing from actual excellence: the question being not whether people shall be satisfied, but how much they shall be carried away with admiration, and infect others by their unexpected enjoyment of what they found.”

-Frederick Law Olmstead, 1893

 
What Olmstead had done first was LISTEN. According to Erik Larson’s The Devil In The White City, after completing his contributions the fair’s grounds and landscaping, Olmstead was busy working on other projects in New York, North Carolina, and Texas. Across the land, people told him of their apprehension about traveling to Chicago due to the recent downturn in the economy, high cost of travel, and the even higher cost of restaurant meals in Chicago (sound familiar?).

 

This lead Olmstead to tell his colleagues that the way to turn these attitudes around was via the sharing of fair experiences in Chicago by attendees’ with the folks back home. They focused on improvements “most likely to increase the gleam” in the stories people took home.

 

Did it work? Yes! After the first few months of disappointing attendance, the second half of the fair season saw record-breaking crowds. Word of mouth had indeed spread from awestruck attendees about the must-see wonders introduced in Chicago such as Tesla’s electricity, moving pictures, neon lights, the massive Ferris Wheel, hamburgers, and Scott Joplin’s music.

 

The Republic

The Republic - Photo by J. Crocker

Results: Who Should Drive Social Media Engagement?

6 Jul

 

 
Here are the results from last week’s FANlet poll asking who within any organization should drive social media engagement.
 

 

 
The clear winner: Marketing. I had anticipated a better showing for Public Relations / Communications, but clearly the majority of voters chose Marketing.  Also, I’m glad to see many votes for Customer Service, which is so important to have involved in the conversation and is an excellent social media entry point for organizations looking to solve immediate business issues.

Poll: Who Should Drive Social Media Engagement?

30 Jun
  
Within any organization, who or what group should be driving the org’s Social Media engagement:
 
 
  • Public Relations / Communications
     
  • Marketing
     
  • Advertising
     
  • Customer Service
     
  • Other
     
Please vote here:

http://bit.ly/cHHEf0

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