Tag Archives: facebook

Facebook Custom Audience Targeting with Your Emails

11 Nov


It’s been said over and over that Content Is King. Sure. But if the content is never read, viewed, or heard by anyone, then it’s not very royal.

If content drops but no one sees it, does it make any impact?

You must spend some dollars on advertising to promote your content or no one will ever see it.  But what’s the best way to throw some money at this problem? Advertise to only to targeted demographics or geography? No.

Take one step back – do you have email addresses of your current or recent clients? Let’s start there. Facebook’s Custom Audience Targeting allows you to serve up that ad to a specific group of people for whom you already have an email address.

Facebook won’t let you pick and choose specific people by name to whom an ad will be served but we can serve up ads to people whose email addresses match! In Facebook’s view, if you’ve already got an email address, then there’s a reason to speak to these people in specific voices.


Here’s for whom it works:

Business to Consumer – Create targets ads for:

  • Your current customers
  • Specific customers part of your loyalty program
  • Potential customers who have signed up for specials or info

Business to Business – Create targeted ads for:

  • Prospects and candidates


Here’s how it works:

FB1 cat

1. Go to Manage Ads on Facebook and click Create Audience button (far left)


FB2 cat

2. Choose Customer List


3. Click Upload File and select your spreadsheet with your email database


One issue to watch is the percentage of your email database that matches with Facebook users. One large franchise system with whom I spoke at FranTech 2015 has seen a match of between 60 – 70%. And an even larger global brand client of mine saw only about 50% match. Why the discrepancy? Consumers are signing up for your offerings with a different email address than what they used to sign up for Facebook.

But still, specifically targeting half or more of the people in your email database is a fantastic and economical way to reach your customers.



Is Facebook Replacing the Internet?

3 Nov


Facebook. It’s where your customers are.

Just a couple of years ago, many digital marketers frequently forecasted the end of Facebook:

It surely won’t dominate for long. There must be some Facebook killer out there. Be platform agnostic – don’t build your business only on Facebook.

But now, unless your customers are a small niche group, they are on Facebook and spending more time on Facebook than ever!

Sure, there’s also still great value in Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and … well, I guess just Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn. Snapchat, Pinterest, and the rest all have their place, and are great for some brands and audiences, but not all.

Play the numbers. Your customers are on Facebook and spending less time on the non-Facebook portion of the Internet. And that portion may be replaced or eaten by Facebook. Here are some parts of your digital world that may soon be replaced by Facebook and a next step for each to help you prepare.

1. Facebook Replacing Your Company Website

Some consumers already won’t leave the “Friendly Confines” of Facebook. In the months and years ahead, fewer of them will be likely to leave and go to some corporate website.

If your digital marketing strategy only focuses on driving people from Facebook to your website, consider skipping this step and engaging that audience while they have given you some attention.

What activity can customers do on your website that grows your business? Ordering product / eCommerce? Making appointments? Downloading videos? Do that same thing on your Facebook page.

Next Step: Look at your website and replicate the business-driving activity.

2. Facebook Video Replacing of YouTube As a Social Video Channel

Facebook is taking a big bite out of YouTube’s video ad business. At the same time, we should look at the current state of using these platforms to share organic video content.

YouTube is amazing, but it’s a repository, not a social channel. Sure, continue to upload all of your videos there for consumers to find through YouTube / Google searches, but don’t drive your Facebook fans there. Where would you prefer customers spend a few extra minutes? On your Facebook page where they can engage and communicate with you or on your YouTube channel, which lends itself more to snark from trolls than genuine customer engagement?

Next Step: Start posting your original video content direct to Facebook, not links from YouTube.

3. Facebook Ads Replacing Online Ads

The Ad Blocking trend is a HUGE opportunity for your brand on Facebook.

Ad blocking tools block nearly all types of mobile ads. But what’s not stopped? Facebook boosted posts (as well as Twitter promoted Tweets and other social ads).

Steve Rubel of Edelman recently wrote that this situation will make earned media more valuable and I absolutely agree. The way to best draw new customers to your brand is with interesting and relevant content. And the best way to attract consumers to that content in the first place is by paid ads on social channels.

Next Step: Jump into Facebook ads, particularly boosted posts now.

What other parts of the Internet do you think may soon be eaten by Facebook?

Please share in the comments section below. We’ll continue this discussion on this week’s episode of Social Geek Radio with my guest digital strategist and author, Chris Adams!

Franchise Sales Using Facebook

5 Oct


How much of your brand’s Facebook activity should be devoted to franchise sales efforts versus consumer marketing and engagement?
Many franchise systems with whom I’ve spoken in the past several years have struggled with balancing their social media communication for consumers and their engagement with potential franchisees. Some designate a certain amount of content on the page for consumer marketing and an amount for franchise development. Others create completely separate Facebook pages for their franchise sales messages.

I don’t recommend either of these practices; all goals of marketing a franchise on Facebook can be achieved in a more holistic approach.


Your Page Versus Their Feed

First, let’s stop thinking of Facebook pages like websites with certain amount of real estate devoted to various parts of your organization. A Facebook page is really just your starting point.

The true power of Facebook communication lies in users seeing your brand and your news on his or her news feed, not on your Facebook page.

It doesn’t really matter what’s on your page. Very few people are ever going to seek out your page and view it the way people once did with websites. Typical consumers won’t be confused by your franchise sales messages because they don’t see them.


Organic Versus Paid Target

Your messages may be seen as organic (free) posts, which will reach 2% to 20% of your fans, depending on your fanbase size. But more likely, your messages will be seen in the form of boosted posts or other types of paid advertising. The reach or size of audience depends how many dollars you want to spend.

Target your paid content by the demographics of your franchise sales candidates. This goes beyond just age and gender; target according to your typical candidates’ interests, industries, and more.

Even within your group of franchise sales posts, you may want to change up content or demographics based on location. Messages promoted to Texas candidates might need to be different than those promoted to Florida candidates.

Your brand’s fans and your franchisees’ customers won’t see that content. With a few exceptions, I typically don’t see anything wrong with showing consumers some franchise sales-specific social media content. But when paying to boost and target Facebook posts, it is cost prohibitive to show all messages to all people.



Why You Don’t Want 1 Million Likes on Facebook

10 Aug



You DON’T want 1 Million Likes on Facebook.

You want 100 pages with 10,000 likes. Or 1,000 pages with 1,000 likes!


Many digital marketers have spent the past year spreading the news that Facebook posts are organically reaching a mere 1% or 2% of their fans’ newsfeeds.

While this may be the case for huge brands with millions of fans, there’s good news for midsize brands. Earlier this year Locowise reported the following average organic post reach for Facebook pages of these sizes:

1 Million+ Likes                     2.27%

500,000 Likes                       7.47%

50,000 Likes                         9.62%

Under 1,000 Likes              14.21%


Sure, you would rather reach 2% of One Million people than 14% of One Thousand people. But what if you could repeat that 14% over another 1,000 pages? 

Who has that potential and could benefit in this current situation? Franchises!  Why? Because they don’t just have one small page with 1,000 likes, but multiple.


It isn’t the number of Likes you have that matters; it’s the number of pages you have and the number of Likes on all those pages.


This has been the case for the past couple of years. In 2013, franchise and restaurant chain brands I consulted reported higher reach levels than brands with a single page. This local page gap is widening and those who have all Facebook eggs in one basket are losing out.

Example using the current organic reach rates – 
Brand A: company with 1 Million Likes on one page reaches 2,270 people.
Brand B: a Franchise brand with 1,000 Likes on 1,000 pages reaches 142,100 people.

Both brands have a total of 1 Million fans, but the Franchise system reaches far more fans with every post shared on all pages. Franchises are indeed greater than the sum of their franchisees.

Act now while the window is open! Fortune 500 companies should be looking for a way to divide their giant page into 1,000 pages. Their organic reach would skyrocket.




Content Marketing and Traditional News

28 Jul

cloud-709095_1920   Facebook’s latest changes to users’ News Feeds means it is more important than ever to create interesting, relevant content that your brand’s fans will want to share with their friends. Let’s add a layer to that share-friendly content strategy: News Outlets. Here’s an example using The Des Moines Register, a news outlet that will be in the global spotlight again due to the upcoming caucuses. A brand or small business may get its story told (placed) not only in the Des Moines Register print version and website, but also via a post on the Register’s Facebook page. And now, most importantly, in the Facebook News Feed of the Des Moines Register’s Facebook Fans who may then also share it! We used to think it was great to get a story placed on a newspaper’s website because the story could be found via search. Getting shared is better. A few recent observations:

  • All media outlets, especially those from smaller markets are posting less hard news content and more human interest, lifestyle, and fun stuff on their Facebook pages for the same reason we do for our clients: it gets noticed and shared.
  • Facebook’s algorithm favors what it deems to be news outlets even if they are just sharing that fun stuff and not hard news.
  • The most shared content on all of Facebook last month came from The Huffington Post. You can argue if this is a credible news site, a biased blog, a tabloid, or all of the above. But Facebook’s favoring has made it a golden opportunity.  

Calling all PR professionals – your services are needed! As more brands jump into content marketing, reaching traditional media outlets that have a great social following needs to be part of the content marketing strategy.   

Hope Is Not a Content Marketing Strategy

14 Jul



Facebook has made a big change that allows users to choose which friends’ or pages’ posts they can “See First” in their News Feeds.

We’re already seeing some pages asking, suggesting, and begging consumers to click on the More button and then click See First to move new posts to the top of their News Feed.

This is after spending the last 6 years asking, suggesting, and begging consumers to click the Like button.

This is not a Strategy; it’s a Hope.

Don’t waste the limited time, space, and attention fans are giving by you asking them to go click something that is not going matter to them and won’t matter much to you in the long run. A few fans may do this, but why would most fans bother? What’s in it for them?


Pages are scrambling to get you to "See First" or "Star" ... this is not a strategy.

Pages are scrambling to get you to “See First” or “Star”          This is not a Strategy; it’s a Hope.


Instead, let’s use the other part of Facebook’s new change to our advantage. The ability for consumers to see their most influential friends’ posts first is exciting and creates interesting opportunities.

Focus your resources on creating the best possible content. Then boost those posts to maximize exposure. If this content is relevant and interesting, you can count on those viewers to share it with their friends.

Users will see your content shared by their friends instead of more noise from other brands’ pages including your competitors’ pages!


The Strategy:

Create good content that is more likely to be shared.


The Tactics:

  1. Post content relevant to your audience (this is nothing new…)
  2. Boost it
  3. If it’s good, it gets shared by your fans or targeted audience to their friends


Again, you’re not gaming a system by begging for “Stars” or “See Firsts”; you’re providing good content that fans with share with their friends. That is always a good idea and it’s a winning strategy.





Facebook Content Marketing in 4 Steps

9 Jul


The most important place for your brand’s content marketing is likely Facebook. For franchise brands, here are the four steps to effectively tell your story to customers.

Three of these are controlled by the franchisor; the fourth and final step is in the hands of each franchisee.

Steps 1, 2, & 3 by the Franchisor:

1. The Franchisor Takes Control of brand on all social pages
Don’t drive consumers to your franchisees’ pages until they’re ready. Be confident that they are all up to date with current logos, images, names, and proper content.

2. The Franchisor Publishes organic content, curated news, great stories
Share valuable content to all franchisee pages for their local fans to consume.

3. The Franchisor Sets up Franchisees to Engage
This may be empowerment for some systems that set up franchisees to dive in.  Or this may be more controlled for some systems that want to approve content from franchisees before it goes out live.


Step 4 by the Franchisee:

4. The Franchisee Boosts Some of the Above Posts on Facebook
This will maximize local audience exposure at the local unit’s discretion and depending on its means. Instead of spending resources on creating content, the franchisee can efficiently choose some of the posts the franchisor published (in Step 2) and boost with local ad dollars. Boosting will vary based on the franchisee’s budget.

Need more info publishing to franchisees’ pages? Connect with my colleagues at Manalto to learn more.


Set up Your Future Facebook Pages Now!

16 Jun



Is part of your business plan for 2016 to expand into Canada? Is your Franchise Development team focused on Texas? Are there big empty spots on your map with no pins in it?

Create Facebook pages now for those future locations, markets, or franchisees.

  • Share the same great content you’re putting on your brand’s corporate page as well as any of your current locations’  or franchisees’ pages. No need to worry about localized special content yet.  
  • Generate some local interest in the brand … and who knows, maybe some local franchise sales leads!
  • You own the page from day one. When a store opens in that market, you can update the name, address, and details.
  • You’re adding value to the sale. Part of what the new franchisee is buying is a pre-made Facebook page with great content already living there and a built in fan base!

Social Geek Tip of the Week: Don’t Inadvertently Advertise Your Competitor

24 Apr



Be careful of inadvertently advertising a competitor.

If you share curated content like news articles and blogs, be sure to read them thoroughly before posting to your company’s Facebook page or Twitter account to make sure you’re not giving a paid plug to a competitor.

I have been very close to sharing a post from a site but did a quick double-check to find that a competitor gets a big (and often paid) credit in the last paragraph.


Franchisors: Don’t Do Facebook Promoted Posts from Your Brand Page.

22 Mar


Facebook Dollar 11


You need Facebook ads and promoted posts not from your brand’s Facebook page, but from all of your franchisees’ Facebook pages.

By pushing out ads from your franchisees’ local pages, you’re ensuring that 100% of this investment is going toward potential customers near your local units. If you only boost posts from a brand page, you will be spending many dollars on advertising to people who are 500 miles from your nearest franchisee, even when using demographic targeting on your brand page.

And those people who are far away miles from your nearest franchisee? Target those folks with your Franchise Development story in promoted posts from your brand page or special Fran Dev pages!



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