Tag Archives: facebook

Social Geek Tip for Next Week: MLK Day Observance

16 Jan

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Be mindful that Monday is Martin Luther King Jr Day in the US. Your fans and customers will see lots of great MLK-related posts in their feed throughout the day. Don’t be the brand that shouts about a sale or 10% off or some loud sales pitch in the midst of this stream of content. Share an inspirational quote or image or something else that your fans will appreciate. 

On the other end of the content spectrum, the State of The Union Address is Tuesday night. This means your fans will see more argumentative political posts than usual on Wednesday and your posts may get buried deeper than usual. If you have timely content or messages you need to get out, Wednesday would be a good day to boost a Facebook post. Some positive messages might play well here too to rise above the political debate.

 

 

Social Geek Tip For Next Week: Don’t Slack During the Holidays!

20 Nov

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You may think, “It’s the holidays and everyone is busy. Everyone is distracted and not paying attention. Anything we post will be ignored…”

But consumers and your customers will be online more than ever! They will be shopping, keeping up with friends & family, and checking Facebook constantly.  

 

5 Reasons to Jump on Facebook Ads NOW

15 Apr

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Some marketers are hesitant about the need to spend marketing budget on Facebook advertising and why / how / where they should find those dollars. A sensible Three Step Process for succeeding in the new Facebook landscape includes creating content most likely to be shared by consumers, putting ad dollars behind it to boost it, and enabling your community to make you part of their community.

Here are 5 reasons why this small investment will pay off.

1. Impressions rule. We talk a lot about interactivity and engagement. But don’t underestimate the plain ol’ audience impressions you’re gaining with Facebook ads. We may not know how great the positive effect of social media impressions are on your brand for years.

Look at TV advertising: buying habits in 2014 are influenced by TV ads from many years ago. If you want to influence the brand of beer I buy today, you should go back in time to 1989 and make better beer ads. That Spuds MacKenzie…he was rad.

  

2. The cost per impression for Facebook ads is almost nothing compared to that of television or newspapers. And your Facebook ad may actually interact with a consumer as opposed to getting skipped on DVR or never read.

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Media Sales guru Herb Tarlek says,
“Newspapers: Kids today don’t read.
And Television: Stinkerino.
Facebook: where your ad dollars buy more!” 

 

3. Even better news is that your competitors may now be on their way off of consumers’ radar. Let your competitors complain about the lack of organic reach and wish for the glory days of 2012. Meanwhile, you can spend a few bucks, target ads to your demo, and be where your competitors’ customers live in 2014.

 

4. He with the best creative wins. Facebook may be like the Super Bowl in that all of the best content will be paid advertising.

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5. You’re proving your product’s value.

Brands behave now on Facebook like record labels or recording artists have always been with radio – looking for free airtime or spins of their content on media that someone else owns and controls.

There’s a lot of competition and limited amount of space and time for your fans. If you want to guarantee exposure, you will need to pay. If you’re not willing to do an inexpensive add buy, then how confident are you about your business?

henry ford

Good Brands Build Their Communities. But Great Brands…

9 Apr

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Many marketers are talking about organic reach on Facebook decreasing rapidly. It seems no one realizes that organic reach has been low – under 20% – for

well over a year. But as reach does continue to drop, it’s time to grow your community before it’s too late and there’s no organic content seen again. Or perhaps I should say it’s time to become part of your customer’s community.

Good brands grow their communities. Great brands become part of their customers’ communities.

This is going to take a three-step process that will rely on your community as well as some ad dollars. It will also require the best, most engaging content you’ve ever created!

 

Step 1: Create engaging content that people want to share

What do people want to share? Marketing messages? Flashy offers? 

No. It must be something that makes them look cool / smart / sexy to their friends. You must create something that will give consumers the dopamine hit they crave each time they share a post.

 

Step 2: Pay for ads with that terrific content

What are you prepared to do? I hope the answer is spend a buck or two on Facebook ads. It’s time to see Facebook as an advertising channel, not a free news service. Mr. Zuckerberg, you created the most intersting communications channel since television. Here’s your dollar.

The good news is that it really only takes a dollar (or a few dollars) to be in the game. Facebook ads are really cheap right now considering the reach you can get versus TV, newspapers, or even email marketing.

 

sean c 1 What are you prepared to do?!?
All of this “new” Facebook work is going to take a bit of courage, faith, and maybe some of the Chicago way.

 

Step 3: This is the easy one…and it’s out of your hands.

Remember in Step 1 where I said you had to create the best, most engaging content ever? This is where it pays off. Your fans and their friends who saw the ads and posts will share them.

A typical overly commercial, online-banner-ad-looking piece of junk will get ignored just like TV commercials and banner ads do now!

 

 

 

The Ultimate Secret to Facebook Marketing: How Often You Should Post!

7 Mar

 

Question: “How often should I post to Facebook?”

 

Question mark 

 

 

 

Answer:

If the stuff you’re posting has value to your community, then often.

If it has no value to your community, then never.

 

 

Have a great weekend!

 

Share Images on Facebook, Not Videos

3 Mar Totally engaging puppy photo courtesy of Hy-Vee's Facebook page.

If a picture is worth 1,000 words, a video is worth at least 500.

I recommend including photos and images over video on your brand’s Facebook posts in most cases.  An image can let readers take the story in their own direction, while videos are at times too limiting

 More importantly, images with text are easier and quicker for your readers to consume and with which to engage

How many times have you clicked an article from a news gathering site and were lead to a video that you had to watch? All you really wanted to do was skim down to read the part that interested you. Many readers simply don’t watch the video. Some watch it and may be disappointed.

Videos are fantastic for in-depth explanation and full feature story telling. But for faster interaction and engagement on your Facebook pages, nothing beats an image. Except images with dogs and cats. 

Totally engaging puppy photo courtesy of Hy-Vee's Facebook page.

Totally engaging puppy photo courtesy of Hy-Vee’s Facebook page.

IFA Digital Marketing & Technology Summit Roundtables

13 Feb

IFA logo 2014

One of my favorite parts of each International Franchise Association Convention is participating in the Marketing and Technology Roundtables. Here’s the info for this year’s Summit:

Digital Marketing & Technology Summit
Sunday, February 23
9:00 am – 12:00 noon           

The feature presentation, Innovative Lead Generation for Your Entire Franchise System, includes speakers Christine Merritt, Head of Business Development, Google and Lana Khavinson, Group Product Marketing Manager, LinkedIn. Ken Colburn, President/CEO, Data Doctors Franchise Systems, Inc will moderate this discussion.

After the presentation, participants will have the opportunity to share ideas and strategies on a variety of technology-related topics at roundtables led by experts in the field.

Please join me for my Roundtable, Facebook Contests and Coupons. We will discuss promotional offerings on brand and franchisee Facebook pages for contests, coupons, and other tactics for driving customers into your franchisees’ locations. 

Facebook-Contests

A Tip for Brands To Not Lose Facebook Fans During the Olympics

9 Feb

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Don’t drive away your Facebook fans and community by posting today’s Olympic results on your page.

While only a portion of your fans and followers will truly be unhappy with you for spoiling their evening Olympic viewing, why give anyone a reason to stop following your brand?

Olympic coverage is unique in that it’s sort of news but also sort of a TV drama. It’s different that sharing breaking news or posting the sad news of a famous person’s death. No one would fault you for that because no one is planning to spend his or her evening watching to see how that turns out. And, nearly all other widely viewed sporting events are aired live on TV in the US. It’s okay to comment about and share live football scores but you shouldn’t spoil a Downton Abbey revelation.

While I advise clients to fill their brand’s Facebook page with interesting, fresh information each day, don’t share Olympic results prior the event airing in primetime. It’s a spoiler-filled landmine.

The key is that there is no upside. Are you showing your fans that can read and share nbcolympics.com faster than they can read it? There are plenty of places online, or via apps, texts, and email alerts that fans who want real-time results already know about. We already have one Bob Costas and that’s plenty!  In 2012, I recall unliking a few brands (and unfriending a business associate!) that decided to be Johnny-on-the-spot and post every American medal win throughout the day. I never went back to become a fan again!  

You have put time and money into growing your community. Don’t lose some fans over something that has no upside or potential to increase engagement.

    

  

Stop Following Social Media Influencers

18 Nov

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What does being a social media influencer mean?

They’re influencing people via Facebook? Or they’re influencing people about Facebook?

One issue with seeing social media as an industry (which I don’t) is this idea that you should have already heard of everything and everyone who is “an expert”. I constantly hear this from marketing colleagues and people who will soon no longer work with me:

“Do you follow Joe X?” (Joe’s name is blocked here to protect the ignorantly blissful.) And I always reply, “Who?”

This is usually followed by, “Whadya mean ya don’t know who Joe X is!?! How can you not follow Joe X?”

No, I don’t follow Joe X, and neither should you.  

No offense is meant to Joe X. Joe X is probably a good writer. I see Joe X’s blog occasionally in search results and I’m usually impressed by Joe X’s writing skills and ideas.  I couldn’t write as well as Joe X in a million years. I will be likely to read future posts should the subject appeal to me, or more likely, the keywords match what I am searching.  But following? Nope. It’s pointless.  

Who should you follow? Two Tactics:

 1. Follow influential people in your industry. If you’re in retail, franchising, food services, healthcare, automotive, or any industry,  there are many smart professionals with whom you should engage. Don’t worry about what they’re saying about Facebook or Twitter…pay attention to what they’re saying about retail, franchising, healthcare, etc.

2. Don’t follow any specific people; search and follow ideas!

“Be less curious about people and more curious about ideas.”
-Marie Curie

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